Film Review: I, Daniel Blake

Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake is a brutally honest depiction of a life on benefits on modern-day Britain. The film’s realism is what packs a punch. Daniel Blake has been told by his doctors that he cannot yet return to work following a heart attack. Nevertheless, the Department for Work and Pensions deems him fit to work. Trying to sort […]

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Film Review: John Wick: Chapter Two

With John Wick: Chapter Two,  director Chad Stahelski returns with a sequel that is more successful than its progenitor. After winding up some final business, John Wick wants to retire back to his quiet life. However, a face from the past demands John Wick pays his debt in the form of an assassination job… John Wick: Chapter Two begins with […]

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Film Review: Hidden Figures

Theodore Melfi’s Hidden Figures is a feel-good film with great performances from its ensemble cast. In 1961, the United States are in a race with Russia to see who can put a man in space. NASA finds untapped potential in a group of African-American female mathematicians working as human computers. Three of these women play a vital role in the space […]

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Film Review: The LEGO Batman Movie

The LEGO Batman Movie is a lot of fun. The film strikes a nice balance between the Batman in-jokes and a wider-appealing comedy and narrative. Batman has an enviable life on the surface. Yet Alfred, his butler, suggests that he lives a solitary life. Bruce Wayne must look after the orphan he has adopted, as well as dealing with Gotham’s […]

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Film Review: Toni Erdmann

Toni Erdmann is something of an anomaly. For English-language viewers, a 162-minute German comedy-drama may not seem like the most appealing film. Yet the film works ever so well. Ines has a busy career working as a consultant in the oil industry in Bucharest. She is surprised when her prankster father pays her an unexpected visit, in the hope the […]

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Film Review: Loving

Jeff Nichols’ Loving is sincere and thoughtful drama based on a real case. Whilst the tone of the film is aptly pensive, the film lacks the punch some may expect. Richard and Mildred are an interracial couple in Virginia, where anti-miscegenation laws are still in effect. The marry out of state, but are arrested at home. The legal battle to have their […]

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Film Review: Life, Animated

Roger Ross Williams’ Life, Animated is an uplifting documentary with a charismatic subject. The film is both informative and very entertaining. Owen Suskind was developed autism at the age of three. As he withdrew into a silent state, his family worried he would not interact with them properly again. However, Owen learned to communicate through his beloved Disney animated films… […]

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Film Review: The Wailing

Hong-jin Na’s The Wailing is a genre-twisting picture that engages, entertains, and frightens. The film keeps viewers guessing until the very end. In the village of Goksung, police officer Jong-Goo is called to investigate a number of grisly murders. With a hallmark rash, these crimes seemed to be linked. His colleague tells him some gossip about a mysterious stranger, whose […]

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Film Review: Hacksaw Ridge

Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge is a brutal true story which illustrates the director’s flair for storytelling. Switching between sentiment and violence, the film is utterly compelling at times. Desmond Doss signs up to join the army during World War II, feeling it is his duty to serve his country as a medic. His religious beliefs mean that he refuses to […]

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Film Review: 100 Streets

Jim O’Hanlon’s 100 Streets is a mostly engaging drama. Some of the film’s narrative strands work better than others. Max is trying to win back estranged wife Emily. George is trying to make everything perfect for his wife. Kingsley is growing tired of the antics of his teenage compatriots. All these stories take place in the London neighbourhood of Battersea… […]

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