Film Review: Bridesmaids

The trailer for Bridesmaids suggests that it is a female version of The Hangover. Instead, the film is a less raucous comedy with moments of genuine poignancy. Nevertheless, it is still very funny and immensely entertaining.

Annie is asked to be maid of honour at her long-time best friend’s wedding. Lillian’s other bridesmaids are an unconventional bunch that includes the very wealthy and immaculately presented Helen. As Annie tries to organise the various rituals, her personal life is unravelling at an alarming rate. This contrast becomes all too stark between Annie’s life and those of Lillian and Helen…

Bridesmaids is a great comedy which also displays genuine emotion. The humour is sometimes crass, but hits the right note more often than not. Paul Feig’s film does not always go for the lowest common denominator in terms of comedy, although there is some very literal toilet humour. On the other hand, the more serious moments of Bridesmaids also work well. Annie’s plight is completely identifiable, even if her actions sometimes are not. The chemistry between cast members is evident, which is an enormous help in generating the film’s more emotional moments.

Part of the reason Bridesmaids is so effective is that aspects of the film are very realistic. The jealousy that Annie projects towards Helen and Lillian is perfectly understandable, given the state of her private life. Moreover, her dalliances with Ted are also believable, despite his dubious personality. It appears that humour is the only unbelievable part of film; situations are exaggerated to generate many of the film’s laughs.

There are only two really problems with Bridesmaids. Firstly, the film is too long. It starts off brilliantly, but wanes after about an hour. Annie’s decline is drawn out, and seems to last too long given that the film is marketed as a comedy. Secondly, two of the bridesmaids inexplicably vanish in the second half of the film. It appears to begin with that Rita and Becca are important members of the supporting cast (and vital to bringing humour), but they are nowhere to be seen later in the film. Sufficient time donated to the marital woes of both Rita and Becca, yet these strands are completely omitted in the latter part of the film without any kind of resolution. Their absence is even more unusual given the recurrence of Matt Lucas’ character, who serves little purpose.

Kristen Wiig is excellent as protagonist Annie. She is attractive but not unrealistic, and is adept at both comedy and drama. Maya Rudolph appears very natural as bride Lillian, while Rose Byrne once again demonstrates her great comedic skills.

Bridesmaids is a genuinely enjoyable film. Although there are a few flaws, it is good to see an almost all-female cast star in a film that both sexes should find entertaining.

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