Film Review: Pitch Perfect

Musical comedy Pitch Perfect is a lot of fun precisely because it does not take itself too seriously. A light-hearted film, which most viewers should find agreeable.

University freshman Beca is reluctant to join in with campus activities, despite the protestations of her dad. She is coerced into joining The Bellas, an all-girl a capella group. The Bellas are desperate to beat their campus rivals and fare better in the competition than their previous year’s entry…

Following the success of television series Glee comes Pitch Perfect. Director Jason Moore knows that audiences will make a connection between the two and there is a pointed reference near the beginning that distinguishes the film from the television show. From the trailer, it is difficult to ascertain the tone of Moore’s film. Thankfully, Pitch Perfect does not disappoint.

Pitch Perfect is at once an amiable spoof of the likes of Glee and a late-teen comedy romance in its own right. The combination of these aspects works well. Without each other, it is doubtful that the film would be as enjoyable as it is. Based on Mickey Rapkin’s book,  the straightforward tale of a freshman’s first year of university is brought to life through humour and music.

Pitch Perfect features a great selection of songs, particularly those from the 1990s. The throwback to earlier decades is further cemented through the reference to a classic eighties teen movie. It is clear where the filmmakers found their inspiration when making Pitch Perfect. Although it has a contemporary setting, the inclusion of 1980s and 1990s references suggest a nostalgia for this era.

Anna Kendrick is well cast as protagonist Beca. Skylar Astin is pleasant as love interest Jesse. It is Rebel Wilson who often steals the show, however, as Amy. Pitch Perfect is a light and enjoyable film which should receive few complaints.

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