• Film Review: The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

    Jacques Demy’s classic musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is just as enchanting fifty-five years after its original release.  Geneviève is in love with Guy, a young car mechanic. When he […]

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  • Film Review: The Nightingale

    Jennifer Kent’s sophomore film The Nightingale is brutal and engrossing. The film is a wonderful showcase for Kent’s conferrable talents. In 1825, Irish convict Clare suffers a traumatic experience. As […]

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  • Film Review: Running with the Devil

    Jason Cabell’s solo directorial debut Running with the Devil is refreshing in its commitment to harsh realities over cheap thrills, for the most part. Unfortunately this doesn’t make the film […]

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  • Film Review: Angel Heart

    Alan Parker’s neo-noir thriller Angel Heart is rightly considered a classic. Parker’s nightmarish vision is just as indelible over thirty years later. Private investigator Harry Angel is hired by a […]

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  • Film Review: Godzilla: King of the Monsters

    Director Michael Dougherty’s Godzilla: King of the Monsters is something of a po-faced monster movie. The emphasis on the human characters weighs the film down. It has been five years […]

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  • LFF 2019 Highlights Part 2

    With the 63rd BFI London Film Festival drawing to a close tonight, there have been a lot of wonderful movies this year. The best films of the first week can […]

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  • Film Review: Jacob, Mimmi and the Talking Dogs

    Edmunds Jansons’ Jacob, Mimmi and the Talking Dogs is an amiable animated adventure with a strong message at its core. When his father goes on a business trip, Jacob goes […]

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  • Film Review: Judy & Punch

    Mirrah Foulkes’ Judy & Punch is an impressive fairy tale. Boasting a distinctive atmosphere and strong performances, the film is an engrossing watch.  In the town of Seaside (which is […]

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  • Film Review: A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood

    Director Marielle Heller’s A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood is a reflective and at times touching drama.  Writer Lloyd Vogel is assigned to complete a small profile on children’s television […]

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  • Film Review: So You Think You Know How It Ends

    The following short films are being screened as part of the When You Think You Know How It Ends programme at this year’s London Film Festival. Be Still My Beating […]

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Film Review: Neds

Neds is a coming of age drama that is both gritty and darkly humorous. But for all its outlandish moments, Neds is really a tragic tale. About to start secondary school in Glasgow in the 1970s, John McGill is a bright young boy despite a troubled home life. Initially avoiding the gang culture that surrounds him, John falls in with […]

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Film Review: Morning Glory

Morning Glory is an energetic and wonderfully upbeat movie. Director Roger Michell offers the right mix of comedy, drama and romance to make Morning Glory a highly entertaining film. Hard-working morning television producer Becky Fuller dreams of working on the Today show. When she is fired from her current role, Becky applies for jobs tirelessly. When she is given the […]

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Film Review: The Dilemma

In the alternate universe of The Dilemma, Kevin James is married to Winona Ryder. Even if you can accept this, you may not be able to endure this mess of a film. Friends since college, Nick and Ronny work together and spend time together, along with Nick’s wife Geneva and Ronny’s girlfriend Beth. When Ronny catches Geneva in a compromising position, he […]

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Film Review: Silken Skin

Having an affair rarely seems as hard work as it does in François Truffaut’s Silken Skin. The film is an entertaining drama, and possibly the best deterrent for those contemplating an extra-marital affair. Esteemed editor and lecturer Pierre Lachenay lives in Paris with his wife Franca and young daughter Sabine. Travelling to a conference in Lisbon, Pierre meets Nicole, a beautiful […]

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Film Review: Rabbit Hole

Rabbit Hole is a thought-provoking drama that sensitively deals with the subject of grief. It is a well-executed film, accomplished but not astounding. Becca and Howie struggle to cope with the death of their young son, Danny. Both have different ways of dealing with his death, an issue that causes them to clash. While Howie holds on to his memories, […]

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Film Review: Blood + Roses

Simon Aitken’s debut feature Blood + Roses is a vampire film that prioritises the relationship angle over themes of horror and the supernatural. Visually satisfying, the film is let down by uninteresting dialogue and some monotone acting. Still affected by a previous trauma, Jane is withdrawn and haunted by dreams, much to the dissatisfaction of her husband Martin. An encounter […]

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Film Review: I Spit on Your Grave

A remake of the notorious 1978 film, I Spit on Your Grave makes some pivotal changes that render it more acceptable than the original. But for all its gore, the remake is not as shocking as the 1978 film, and is unlikely to have the same impact. Writer Jennifer Hills decides to stay at a reclusive cabin in order to begin […]

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Film Review: Blue Valentine

Blue Valentine is one of the rare films that elicits a strong emotional response. Some viewers may feel emotionally drained after seeing the film, but it is refreshing for a film to provoke a genuine response in this age of desensitisation. Dean and Cindy are married with a young daughter. Their current troubled relationship contrasts strikingly with the period in […]

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Film Review: The Green Hornet

Not one of the more popular comic book superheroes, the film The Green Hornet seems destined to follow the same fate. Although the film is entertaining, it is also instantly forgettable. Following his father’s death, Britt Reid takes over the reigns at The Daily Sentinel. When Britt and his late father’s assistant Kato stop a robbery, the pair decide to […]

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