• Film Review: Siberia

    Director Matthew Ross’ thriller Siberia offers a suitably engaging first half. The second half derailment makes for an ultimately unsatisfying film.  Lucas Hill, an American diamond trader, travels to Russia […]

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  • Previews: Creed II Clip, Uglydolls, More!

    Lots of film-related goodness in this week’s preview of coming attractions, including a new Creed II clip, Uglydolls, Missing Link, and more… Creed II Clip Here is a brand new […]

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  • LFF 2018 Highlights Part 2

    With another BFI London Film Festival reaching its conclusion tonight, there have been some fantastic films this year. The best films of the first week of the festival can be […]

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  • Film Review: Stan & Ollie

    Jon S. Baird’s Stan & Ollie is a lovingly-crafted portrait of the comedy duo. The strong performances certainly add to this. It is 1953, and comedy double act Stan Laurel […]

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  • Film Review: United Skates

    Dyana Winkler and Tina Brown’s United Skates is a thoroughly entertaining documentary. The film is a very impressive debut from the directors. Roller skating is a popular subculture in the […]

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  • Film Review: Can You Ever Forgive Me?

    Marielle Heller’s Can You Ever Forgive Me? is an enjoyable comedy drama. The film is often funny, and at times moving. Writer Lee Israel is down on her luck. After […]

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  • Film Review: If Beale Street Could Talk

    Barry Jenkins has created one of the best films of the year with the beguiling If Beale Street Could Talk. The film is powerful viewing. In 1970s Harlem, Tish and […]

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  • Film Review: Cam

    Daniel Goldhaber’s Cam is a nervy thriller. The taut atmosphere is only let down by a slightly disappointing finale.  Alice is a cam girl, putting on shows as her alter ego […]

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  • Film Review: Unsettling

    Iris Zaki’s Unsettling is a revealing documentary. By speaking to Israeli settlers on the West Bank, the film shines a light on a controversial topic. Filmmaker Iris Zaki creates a […]

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  • Film Review: The Sisters Brothers

      Jacques Audiard’s The Sisters Brothers is a reflective western. By subverting some of the genre tropes, Audiard has created an interesting addition to the field. Eli and Charlie Sisters are […]

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Film Review: Whatever Works

Woody Allen’s Whatever Works, released only recently in the UK, sees a return to form for one of cinema’s most industrious directors and screenwriters. Boris is an aging, cynical New Yorker set in his ways. When he decides to let a young runaway stay at his apartment, the two form an unlikely friendship, influencing each others’ long-standing beliefs… Taking the action back to […]

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Film Review: The Collector

Another year, another highly questionable entry in the torture-porn sub-genre. The Collector offers little originality, little fear, and sadly little entertainment. So that the mother of his child is able to pay off her debt to loan sharks, Arkin breaks into his employer’s home, to steal a valuable jewel. When he gets inside however, he realises he is not alone… There are […]

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Film Review: Get Him to the Greek

A spin-off from Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Get Him to the Greek focuses on Russell Brand’s rock star character Aldous Snow. Whilst it may not be as consistently amusing as its predecessor, Get Him to the Greek is very humorous at times, and an entertaining, if mindless, film. Aaron Green has 72 hours to get rock star Aldous Snow from London […]

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Film Review: Our Family Wedding

Our Family Wedding is a formulaic but fairly amusing culture-clash rom-com. What differentiates it from other films of this nature is the fact that none of the protagonists are white; instead a Latino family clashes with an African-American one, over the wedding of their children. Lucia and Marcus are madly in love and want to get married before they go […]

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Film Review: Brooklyn’s Finest

In one of the opening scenes of the film, Richard Gere practices committing suicide with an unloaded gun.  No, all those gerbil rumours haven’t gotten too much for him. Rather, this scene is emblematic of the themes and tone of Brooklyn’s Finest. Antoine Fuqua’s film follows the stories of three cops, all in different stages of their career. Although, for the […]

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Film Review: Greenberg

Ben Stiller plays a distinctly obnoxious protagonist in Greenberg, yet it is still a watchable film. The fact the audience will keep watching despite the questionable behaviour of the main character can definitely be attributed to Stiller’s solid performance in Greenberg. Recovering from a breakdown, Roger Greenberg house-sits his brother’s Los Angeles home with the sole aim of doing nothing. […]

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Film Review: The Killer Inside Me

Michael Winterbottom’s controversial film is at times hard to watch, with its brutal depictions of violence. The Killer Inside Me, however, is for the most part a well-crafted drama, with strong performances from its cast. Centering on a deputy sheriff in a small Texan town, The Killer Inside Me explores the mind of this psychologically damaged individual. As the film […]

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Film Review: 4.3.2.1

Writer and Co-Director Noel Clarke delivers up another teen drama with a gritty urban backdrop. 4.3.2.1 takes the some of the action transatlantic, however, and posits four female protagonists at the centre of the narrative. 4.3.2.1 tells the story of each of the four friends, after a chance encounter with a group of diamond thieves.  Taking place over an eventful […]

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Film Review: Sex and the City 2

Liza Minnelli singing ‘Single Ladies’ is the highlight of Sex and the City 2. Although there are other entertaining moments in the film, there are also a number of troubling issues. The film is set two years after the first Sex and the City movie. Carrie and Big are in somewhat of a rut, whilst Samantha is trying to defy […]

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