• Film Review: Siberia

    Director Matthew Ross’ thriller Siberia offers a suitably engaging first half. The second half derailment makes for an ultimately unsatisfying film.  Lucas Hill, an American diamond trader, travels to Russia […]

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  • Previews: Creed II Clip, Uglydolls, More!

    Lots of film-related goodness in this week’s preview of coming attractions, including a new Creed II clip, Uglydolls, Missing Link, and more… Creed II Clip Here is a brand new […]

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  • LFF 2018 Highlights Part 2

    With another BFI London Film Festival reaching its conclusion tonight, there have been some fantastic films this year. The best films of the first week of the festival can be […]

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  • Film Review: Stan & Ollie

    Jon S. Baird’s Stan & Ollie is a lovingly-crafted portrait of the comedy duo. The strong performances certainly add to this. It is 1953, and comedy double act Stan Laurel […]

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  • Film Review: United Skates

    Dyana Winkler and Tina Brown’s United Skates is a thoroughly entertaining documentary. The film is a very impressive debut from the directors. Roller skating is a popular subculture in the […]

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  • Film Review: Can You Ever Forgive Me?

    Marielle Heller’s Can You Ever Forgive Me? is an enjoyable comedy drama. The film is often funny, and at times moving. Writer Lee Israel is down on her luck. After […]

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  • Film Review: If Beale Street Could Talk

    Barry Jenkins has created one of the best films of the year with the beguiling If Beale Street Could Talk. The film is powerful viewing. In 1970s Harlem, Tish and […]

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  • Film Review: Cam

    Daniel Goldhaber’s Cam is a nervy thriller. The taut atmosphere is only let down by a slightly disappointing finale.  Alice is a cam girl, putting on shows as her alter ego […]

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  • Film Review: Unsettling

    Iris Zaki’s Unsettling is a revealing documentary. By speaking to Israeli settlers on the West Bank, the film shines a light on a controversial topic. Filmmaker Iris Zaki creates a […]

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  • Film Review: The Sisters Brothers

      Jacques Audiard’s The Sisters Brothers is a reflective western. By subverting some of the genre tropes, Audiard has created an interesting addition to the field. Eli and Charlie Sisters are […]

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Film Review: Date Night

The lure of leads Steve Carell and Tina Fey is undoubtedly the biggest draw of Date Night. Sadly the film does not live up to expectations, despite good performances from the popular comedy actors. The main problem with Date Night is that it simply isn’t that funny.  There are good one-liners and funny incidents, however it is not the laugh-a-minute […]

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Film Review: Hot Tub Time Machine

Perhaps the biggest achievement of Hot Tub Time Machine is that it cements Back to the Future as the quintessential time-travel movie. That’s not to say it is a bad film, merely that the influence of Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 classic is abundantly clear. Oh, the 1980s. Such a wonderful decade. Adam (played by John Cusack) and friends inadvertently time-travel back to 1986, […]

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Film Review: The Infidel

David Baddiel’s foray into feature film writing is what one might expect of him; ok, but nothing remarkable. The Infidel has some humorous episodes, however it falls short overall. Omid Djalili plays Mahmud Nasir, a moderate Muslim who, following the death of his mother, finds out he was adopted from Jewish parents. The film follows Mahmud as he comes to terms with this shock, befriending […]

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Film Review: Repo Men

If you are looking for a fast-paced violent thriller, and do not mind too much about originality, Repo Men is probably the film for you. If, however, you are expecting something more than this, you will most likely be disappointed by the end of this film. Set in the near future, Remy, played by Jude Law, is works for a […]

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Film Review: The Ghost

Based on the best-selling novel by Robert Harris, The Ghost exhibits why Roman Polanski is widely considered one of the greatest directors. From the very beginning the film is captivating, drawing in the viewer until the end credits roll. The Ghost tells the story of a ghost writer who is commissioned to help finish the memoirs of the former British […]

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Film Review: How to Train Your Dragon

How to Train Your Dragon works well on every level, and should be as entertaining for adults as it is children. The film’s box office success is unsurprising, particularly when considering the 3D element it offers. The film centres on Hiccup, a young Viking who is worlds apart from the rest of his town, particularly his father. Hiccup is immediately […]

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Film Review: Touch of Evil

Orson Welles’ film noir classic is still affecting over fifty years since its original release. Whilst the themes Touch of Evil focuses on are nothing new, it is the combination of said themes with the direction, cinematography and art design that generates a pervading atmosphere. Charlton Heston plays Mexican cop Vargas, who along with his new American bride Susan (played […]

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Film Review: Clash of the Titans

Seeing the film a few weeks after its release, Clash of the Titans is actually an enjoyable enough movie. Granted, this may be the case as expectations were significantly lowered by the considerable amount of negative press and reviews the film has received. Louis Leterrier’s version makes a number of changes to the plot from the 1981 original. Sam Worthington’s Perseus no […]

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Film Review: Shelter

Shelter opens with rather an interesting supposition; multiple personality disorder has been revealed to be a fallacy, and can no longer be held up as an excuse for criminal behaviour. Unfortunately, the film goes downhill from here, and what is left is a dull narrative littered with stock horror clichés and not much else. The film initially sets up a […]

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Film Review: Repulsion

Roman Polanski’s 1965 psychological thriller Repulsion packs a punch in the unnerving atmosphere it creates. Filmed in black and white, this low-budget picture was Polanski’s first English-language feature. Repulsion‘s narrative centres on Carol, a beautiful but distant French girl living with her sister in London. As the film progresses, her psychosis becomes more and more severe, resulting in cataclysmic effects. […]

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