• Previews: Creed II Clip, Uglydolls, More!

    Lots of film-related goodness in this week’s preview of coming attractions, including a new Creed II clip, Uglydolls, Missing Link, and more… Creed II Clip Here is a brand new […]

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  • LFF 2018 Highlights Part 2

    With another BFI London Film Festival reaching its conclusion tonight, there have been some fantastic films this year. The best films of the first week of the festival can be […]

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  • Film Review: Stan & Ollie

    Jon S. Baird’s Stan & Ollie is a lovingly-crafted portrait of the comedy duo. The strong performances certainly add to this. It is 1953, and comedy double act Stan Laurel […]

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  • Film Review: United Skates

    Dyana Winkler and Tina Brown’s United Skates is a thoroughly entertaining documentary. The film is a very impressive debut from the directors. Roller skating is a popular subculture in the […]

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  • Film Review: Can You Ever Forgive Me?

    Marielle Heller’s Can You Ever Forgive Me? is an enjoyable comedy drama. The film is often funny, and at times moving. Writer Lee Israel is down on her luck. After […]

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  • Film Review: If Beale Street Could Talk

    Barry Jenkins has created one of the best films of the year with the beguiling If Beale Street Could Talk. The film is powerful viewing. In 1970s Harlem, Tish and […]

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  • Film Review: Cam

    Daniel Goldhaber’s Cam is a nervy thriller. The taut atmosphere is only let down by a slightly disappointing finale.  Alice is a cam girl, putting on shows as her alter ego […]

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  • Film Review: Unsettling

    Iris Zaki’s Unsettling is a revealing documentary. By speaking to Israeli settlers on the West Bank, the film shines a light on a controversial topic. Filmmaker Iris Zaki creates a […]

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  • Film Review: The Sisters Brothers

      Jacques Audiard’s The Sisters Brothers is a reflective western. By subverting some of the genre tropes, Audiard has created an interesting addition to the field. Eli and Charlie Sisters are […]

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  • Film Review: Assassination Nation

    Sam Levinson’s Assassination Nation is an entertaining satire. The film is brash, outlandish, and a lot of fun.  Lily and her three friends are just four ordinary teens at high […]

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Film Review: The Last Station

The Last Station tells the story of the final days of Leo Tolstoy, and the tumultuous relationship he has with his wife, the Countess Sofya. Rather than a biopic, The Last Station is more concerned with the relationship between the two protagonists and what it reveals about life. Although the focus is on Tolstoy and Sofya, there is a parallel […]

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Film Review: The Crazies

Eisner’s remake of the low-budget 1973 The Crazies Romero flick is an entertaining enough affair. The slick production gives it more of a blockbuster feel than the original, though the premise is much the same. The contamination of a small town’s water supply leads to some strange behaviour, culminating in the presence of the undead and the containment of the […]

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Film Review: Youth in Revolt

The tricky thing with comedy dramas is getting the balance right between the two genres. Err on the side of comedy, and risk creating characters that the audience doesn’t care about. Lay emphasis on the depth of characters and seriousness of narrative, and inevitably the laughs will be sparse. Youth in Revolt has a difficult time in marrying the two […]

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Film Review: Solomon Kane

Publicity for Solomon Kane focussed heavily on the fact that the character was created by Robert E. Howard, of Conan fame. Presumably, marketing executives hoped this association would help snare sword and sorcery devotees. And though Solomon Kane and the Conan films have very different settings, there are many parallels between both the stories and the characters. Kane is a […]

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Film Review: Ponyo

Ponyo tells the enchanted tale of Sosuke and his goldfish Ponyo, who longs to be human. Through the power of magic, Ponyo gets her wish, but it is only Sosuke who can make her dream permanent. The animation  is fluid and lively, what one has come to expect from Studio Ghibli. Unlike such fare as Howl’s Moving Castle, Ponyo appears, at […]

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Film Review: A Single Man

Ford’s directorial debut is an aural and visual feast. Centering on a day in the life of George, a college professor bereaved from the loss of his long-term partner, this is a film about the minor, seemingly inconsequential moments in life rather than the obviously momentous events. Set in the early 1960s, A Single Man exposes attitudes to homosexuality at […]

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Film Review: Precious

Precious is almost unrelentingly sombre in the issues the film addresses. The lighter spots are saved for the title character’s daydreams, and the relationship she builds with her classmates and teacher. These lighthearted moments are not only what save the teenage protagonist, but also the film itself. Without these, Precious offers a grim tale of abuse and disadvantage. Through her […]

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Film Review: The Wolfman

“Even a man who is pure in heart”, the remake begins, instantly impressing the weight of the original on this new version of the lycanthropic tale. In the current climate of the modern gothic in films such as Twilight and television series’ like True Blood, it is refreshing to see a Victorian-set gothic horror. Comparisons will be made to the […]

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