• Film Review: The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

    Jacques Demy’s classic musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is just as enchanting fifty-five years after its original release.  Geneviève is in love with Guy, a young car mechanic. When he […]

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  • Film Review: The Nightingale

    Jennifer Kent’s sophomore film The Nightingale is brutal and engrossing. The film is a wonderful showcase for Kent’s conferrable talents. In 1825, Irish convict Clare suffers a traumatic experience. As […]

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  • Film Review: Running with the Devil

    Jason Cabell’s solo directorial debut Running with the Devil is refreshing in its commitment to harsh realities over cheap thrills, for the most part. Unfortunately this doesn’t make the film […]

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  • Film Review: Angel Heart

    Alan Parker’s neo-noir thriller Angel Heart is rightly considered a classic. Parker’s nightmarish vision is just as indelible over thirty years later. Private investigator Harry Angel is hired by a […]

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  • Film Review: Godzilla: King of the Monsters

    Director Michael Dougherty’s Godzilla: King of the Monsters is something of a po-faced monster movie. The emphasis on the human characters weighs the film down. It has been five years […]

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  • LFF 2019 Highlights Part 2

    With the 63rd BFI London Film Festival drawing to a close tonight, there have been a lot of wonderful movies this year. The best films of the first week can […]

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  • Film Review: Jacob, Mimmi and the Talking Dogs

    Edmunds Jansons’ Jacob, Mimmi and the Talking Dogs is an amiable animated adventure with a strong message at its core. When his father goes on a business trip, Jacob goes […]

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  • Film Review: Judy & Punch

    Mirrah Foulkes’ Judy & Punch is an impressive fairy tale. Boasting a distinctive atmosphere and strong performances, the film is an engrossing watch.  In the town of Seaside (which is […]

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  • Film Review: A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood

    Director Marielle Heller’s A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood is a reflective and at times touching drama.  Writer Lloyd Vogel is assigned to complete a small profile on children’s television […]

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  • Film Review: So You Think You Know How It Ends

    The following short films are being screened as part of the When You Think You Know How It Ends programme at this year’s London Film Festival. Be Still My Beating […]

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Film Review: The Prince’s Voyage

Jean-François Laguionie and Xavier Picard’s The Prince’s Voyage (Le Voyage Du Prince) is an enchanting animated tale.  12-year-old Tom discovers a wounded monkey on the beach. When he comes around, the older simian claims to be a prince from another land… A follow-up to 1999’s A Monkey’s Tale (although the film works perfectly as a standalone picture), The Prince’s Voyage is a […]

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Film Review: Blackbird

Director Roger Michell’s drama Blackbird features a stellar cast on excellent form.  Lily has a terminal illness and is in decline. She gathers her family together for one last weekend before she dies… Focusing on a terminally ill woman who wishes to take her life before her condition worsens, Blackbird functions as a last supper for protagonist and her family. […]

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Film Review: Little Monsters

Writer-director Abe Forsythe’s Little Monsters is an entertaining, if forgettable, zombie comedy. The film’s leads are a definite plus. Dave agrees to chaperone his nephew’s class trip, after he takes a shine to the teacher Miss Caroline. The pair must protect the children when an zombie outbreak occurs… The narrative of Little Monsters follows Dave, an adult who clearly needs to […]

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Film Review: Jojo Rabbit

Taika Waititi’s gentle satire Jojo Rabbit delivers its message with a humour and a surprising amount of heart.  Young Jojo is a member of the Hitler Youth. Living in Germany towards the end of World War II, Jojo’s best friend is an imaginary Adolf Hitler. When Jojo makes a discovery, he must confront his blind nationalism… Written and directed by […]

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Film Review: Saint Maud

Writer-director Rose Glass’ Saint Maud is a unnerving and intense gothic thriller. The filmmaker has delivered an atmospheric and striking debut. Maud, a private nurse, is sent on an assignment to care for a terminally ill woman. Maud is a pious young woman, and becomes preoccupied with saving her patient’s soul… Saint Maud concentrates primarily on a nurse and her relationship […]

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Film Review: The Report

The Report provides background and detail on a story that needs to be told. Scott Z. Burns does this in an entertaining and informative manner.  Senate staffer Dan J. Jones is tasked with leading an investigation into CIA’s post-9/11 Detention and Interrogation programme. As he uncovers uncomfortable truths, some do not want his report to be published… A story about […]

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Film Review: The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Joe Talbot’s The Last Black Man in San Francisco is a funny, moving, thought-provoking, and outstanding debut.  San Francisco native Jimmie is struggling in an ever-changing city. He is determined to get back to his family home, in a city where locals are out priced and marginalised… Directed and co-written by Joe Talbot (with Jimmie Fails – based on his […]

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Film Review: Cold Case Hammarskjöld

Mads Brügger’s Cold Case Hammarskjöld offers an intriguing premise and a volatile outcome. The film is a gripping, stranger-than-fiction tale. In 1961, a plane carrying then UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjöld crashed just outside an airport in Zambia. Filmmaker Mads Brügger investigates whether there was a plot to kill Hammarskjöld, and who was behind it… On the surface, Cold Case Hammarskjöld […]

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